(Source: broveria, via incestanddragons)

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Monday, 20th October

whitegirlsaintshit:

shialabae:

brownglucose:

imsoshive:

She on beat like a muhhfucka

image

shoutout to her for being so positive while going through chemo

FUCK ME UP MARY BETH

GET IT BITCH!!!! YESSS!!!! FUCK IT UP I LOVE IT!!!!!

(via lapeste)

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Monday, 20th October

drunktrophywife:

Loving this concept

(via aminaabramovic)

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Monday, 20th October
cactuseeds:

Kill Bill: Vol. 2
2004
Directed by Quentin Tarantino

cactuseeds:

Kill Bill: Vol. 2

2004

Directed by Quentin Tarantino

(via kirschtxin)

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Monday, 20th October

sealcat:

no we don’t use that room there was once a spider in it

(via americandreamwitch)

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Monday, 20th October
I’m not scared of desperately uncool cultural reactionaries like Jack Thompson or anti-witchcraft Harry Potter burners. I’m scared of the people who do hold cultural power, who have the loud voice, who are, in fact, the cool kids, but think they’re embattled underdogs. I’m scared of the people who think that because disco was “taking over music” they had the right to “fight back” bullying and attacking disco performers and fans.

I’m scared of people who look at someone like Zoe Quinn, an individual who makes free indie games, or Anita Sarkeesian, an individual who makes free YouTube videos, and honestly think that these women are a powerful “corrupt” force taking away the freedom of the vast mob of angry young male gamers and the billion-dollar industry that endlessly caters to them, and that working to shut them up and drive them out somehow constitutes justice. The dominant demographic voice in some given fandom or scene feeling attacked by an influx of new, different fans and rallying the troops against “oppression” in reaction is not at all unique. It happens everywhere, all the time.

But let’s be honest: It’s usually guys doing it. Our various “culture wars” tend to boil down to one specific culture war, the one about men wanting to feel like Real Men and lashing out at the women who won’t let them. Whenever men feel like masculinity is under attack, men get dangerous. Because that’s exactly what masculinity teaches you to do, what masculinity is about. Defending yourself with disproportionate force against any loss of power? That’s what masculinity is.
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Monday, 20th October
antiqueart:

Martin Johnson Heade - Apple Blossoms and Hummingbird (1871)

antiqueart:

Martin Johnson Heade - Apple Blossoms and Hummingbird (1871)

(via cryingandchainsmoking)

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Monday, 20th October
I asked my ex, now good friend, if she would ever have an open relationship and she said, “No, I don’t think I could do that” then after a pause and a smile, “but what about love affair friendships?” She went on to describe an impenetrable fortress of female friendship, her own group of best mates who’d known each other since school and had supported and loved each other through almost all of their lifetimes. They sounded far more bonded to, and in love with one another, than their respective husbands. It struck me that we don’t have the language to reflect the diversity and breadth of connections we experience. Why is sex the thing we tend to define a relationship by, when in fact it can be simple casual fun without a deep emotional transaction? Why do we say “just friends” when, for some of us, a friendship goes deeper? Can we define a new currency of commitment that celebrates and values this? Instead of having multiple confusing interpretations of the same word, could we have different words? What if we viewed our relationships as a pyramid structure with our primary partner at the top and a host of lovers, friends, spiritual soul mates, colleagues, and acquaintances beneath that?

(Source: assthony, via indikos)

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Sunday, 19th October
yungneako:

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yungneako:

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(Source: gimb, via yourlittlebreasts)

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Sunday, 19th October